Category Archives: Dutch Oven

Shiny of the Week – Feb. 11, 2011


(As in “oooooooh, shiny! I must have this!”)

So I’m going to try out an idea to do a post a week on some sort of piece of gear that I really enjoy using while camping or for other Scouting purposes. We’ll see how it goes.

For the first one, since I’ve got the dutch oven thing going on for the last post and a few previous to this, I’m going to make this my first “Shiny of the Week.”

The Coleman Parchment Paper Dutch Oven Liner
Coleman Dutch Oven Liners

These things are the bomb! They make the worst part of dutch oven cooking (clean up) the best part! So worth the cost. I know lots of units will use aluminum foil to line their dutch ovens and that works but whatever you’re cooking (say beans or chili) could get through where the foil overlaps or stirring can destroy the foil and then you get baked on bean residue in your dutch oven (and possibly a little extra aluminum in your diet if you don’t watch out). These liners are so much easier than that. When you’re done you just lift it out and the already clean dutch oven is ready to be oiled and put away. Just like that! I am now a fan.

I’ll even go to the Walmarts to buy them, and I make a point to never shop there normally! So kind of a short post today, but that’s my first “Shiny of the Week.” What do you guys think about the liners, or what method have you found that works well on making dutch oven cleanup easier?

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PO-TA-TOES


What we need is a few good taters…

Song virus achieved?

Anyway, goodness knows I love me some taters. Especially on campouts. And I have to say that the newest addition to Scouting Magazine over the last few issues has been the article on Dutch Oven cooking and it is great! I previously posted about the Kalamata Roast recipe that we made back at John Colter in November 2010. This post is about the Udder Potatoes recipe found in the most recent issue.

For Christmas my Jen-nay (we’s like peas and carrots) got me a Lodge 12″ Cast Iron Camping Dutch Oven. What’s the difference between a camping dutch oven and a regular dutch oven? Nothing outrageous. But the camping dutch ovens have the three peg-legs on the bottom and the lid has the lip on top – both made to more effectively deal with charcoal. And they’re great! Even with all the technological advances in cookware over the last couple of centuries, cast iron still remains as the king of the hill, and for good reason. It works!

I *heart* my dutch oven, it is great! I’ve already used it a few times since Christmas and it is also the nifty BSA logo branded one. You can buy your own at your local Scout Shop (here is a link to the Scoutstuff.org page on it), or via Lodge’s website here. I’d suggest going through your local Scout Shop to save on shipping (it is heavy) and because the price is about $70 compared to nearly $100 at other places. The pricetag seems steep but it is worth every penny.

So anyway, back to the taters…

I saw the recipe in the most recent issue of Scouting and decided that it would be a great dish to try for the Pack Winter Campout in January. I had all the Webelos with me in a primitive cabin area of Camp Birch while the rest of the pack was in the comfort of the brand new Turner Building. Here’s the recipe:

The Udder Potatoes

Ingredients

½ pound of bacon, chopped
2 30-ounce packages frozen shredded hash browns
4 large green onions, chopped
½ teaspoon Morton Nature’s Seasons Seasoning Blend
2 teaspoons salt
½ teaspoon pepper
3½ cups heavy whipping cream
11 tablespoons butter, cut into slices
Set out package of frozen hash browns for about half an hour before baking. Allow them to thaw slightly. Fry bacon in Dutch oven until crisp. Pour off grease. Add hash browns, green onions, and seasonings. Mix gently until evenly distributed.

Pour cream over potato mixture and place butter slices on top. Bake in a 12-inch Dutch oven at 350 degrees (16 coals on top, 10 coals below) for 45 minutes. Remove pot from bottom heat. Put bottom coals on top of lid and tilt the lid slightly open for 15-20 minutes until browned on top.

I guarantee once your Scouts get a taste of this dish, if you ever ask them if they want scalloped or cheese potatoes again, they will all cry out, “No! We want the udder ones!”

Serves: 15-18

So we didn’t exactly follow the recipe, but they turned out amazing. First off, who uses half a pound of bacon when you’re camping? You can buy bacon at the grocery normally in 12 oz or 16 oz packages. So we used a 12 oz package, but we used the whole package. Extra bacon is good for the soul. Likewise with the heavy cream. I don’t know where you can buy 3-1/2 cups of cream. I see it in pints and quarts. So we bought a quart and used the whole quart – no point in saving half a cup of heavy cream when you’re on a campout.

Due to the extreme cold at the time, we used extra coals and due to the extra liquid I cooked it a little longer than originally stated. Came out AWESOME! I’ve remade it two times since then with great results too.

My personal preference it to lighten up on the green onion because that flavor can easily overpower, and more bacon because, well, it’s bacon! Jen-nay thinks cheese would make it even better, I think it is fine without the cheese. But I’m thinking about getting some of the cheese flavored french fried onion pieces and for the last five minutes of cooking sprinkle those across the top for crunch.

So now I’ve got dutch oven posts on a main dish, side dish and dessert. Wonder what will be next? We’ll have to wait and see…

Cobbler in the regular oven, really?


So apparently you can make a cobbler that isn’t in a dutch oven…who knew?

Last night’s dessert started out as “There is a half a #10 can of apple pie filling leftover from the pack meeting. What are we going to do with this?” How about a caramel apple pie? Or, better yet, caramel apple cobbler!

So off to the store we go. Grab a box of Duncan Hines® Moist Deluxe Caramel Cake Mix, a bottle of Smucker’s® Caramel Sundae Syrup, a container of Edy’s® Slow Churned French Vanilla Ice Cream and some butter. We already had cinnamon sugar at the house.

So we started by mixing in a good amount of the caramel syrup into the can of apple pie filling along with some cinnamon sugar, spread that into the bottom of a 13×9 glass baking dish, then covered the top with the cake mix. Poured the 1-1/3 cups of water over the cake mix and spread around about 2/3 of a stick of butter cut into small cubes. Sprinkled more cinnamon sugar over top of the cake mix and butter. Threw it all into the oven at 375 for about 35-40 minutes and it came out great. Topped it off with a scoop of ice cream and some more caramel sauce, it turned out great!

So trying to convert this recipe to work at the campsite (except for maybe the ice cream) and to use a whole #10 can, I’m thinking it would look like this:

Caramel Apple Cobbler
#10 can of apple pie filling
1 20-oz bottle caramel sundae syrup
4 Tablespoons cinnamon sugar, divided
1 box caramel cake mix
1 stick butter, cut into small cubes
1-1/3 cup tap water

Open the #10 can of pie filling, and stir in half the cinnamon sugar and about half of the caramel sauce. Pour into the bottom of a 12″ dutch oven (lined with parchment paper or aluminum foil if desired). Pour evenly over the top the box of cake mix, then drizzle the water onto the cake mix as evenly as possible. Top with the butter and sprinkle the remaining cinnamon sugar over the top.

Cook at 375 degrees (17 coals on top / 11 on bottom) for 35-45 minutes or until desired doneness of the cake, changing out the charcoal as needed to ensure proper heating.

Serve with a drizzle of the remaining caramel sauce and a scoop of vanilla ice cream (if you can get it to the campsite).

I’m thinking that might have to be one we try out at the winter camp out in January!

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