Tag Archives: #bsajambo

Jambo 2017 Registration is Live!


Im-Ready

BSA National just went live with registrations for the National Jamboree to be held at The Summit Bechtel Reserve near Beckley WV from July 15 – 29, 2017.  We are stoked!  Both Bear Bait and Tangled were able to go to Jambo in 2013, the first to be held at The Summit.  Him as a Boy Scout and her as one of the first group of Venturing youth (including girls) to be able to attend.  I really wanted to go on staff that time, but having had just changed jobs the year before, it wasn’t in the cards.  Got to attend as a visitor for a day and it was a really amazing experience.

Needless to say, as soon as we heard that registration went live yesterday, we submitted our registrations…yesterday!  Bear Bait as a Boy Scout again, and Tangled as a Venturing youth.  It will be the last National Jamboree either can attend as youth participants.  By the 2021 National Jamboree they’ll be adult Scouters (hopefully) and can go as Staff.  I submitted a volunteer staff application.  This is the email I got after my registration was submitted:

Dear <Middletownscouter>:

Thank you for submitting an application to be Volunteer Staff at 2017’s National Jamboree. You are receiving this email because we have record of you having submitted an application and having paid your deposit. As a reminder, no further payments are due until a staff position has been offered and accepted.

You will not receive any further updates concerning your application for the next 60-90 days. During that time, we will verify your BSA membership information. Once verified, your application will be routed to your council for the first step in the approval process. If there is a problem verifying your membership information, we will contact you to let you know.

At the completion of the Council review, you will be notified by email whether your application has been approved for Jamboree consideration or not. Please be patient during this process and keep your contact information updated within the jamboree registration system. Check your email (and junk/spam folder) on a regular basis.

Be sure and keep a copy of your confirmation for your records. When logging back into your account for any reason, you will use your registration code as your log in.

Registration Code: <snipped>

Thank you,
Jamboree Registrar

Woo-hoo!  Time to start selling some popcorn…or patches…or plasma…it’s going to be expensive.  Between registration fees, equipment, incidentals and spending money for the two kids last time we spent about $3000 for the two to attend.  But it was (is, and will be) worth every penny!

When you register for Staff, you have to give them three preferences for where you’d like to volunteer.  That can be kind of tough, there are many different choices!  I put my three choices as:

1. Administration – Communications / National Media
2. Program – Wheeled Sports BMX Mechanic
3. Program – Canopy Tours Guide

The first because I’m hoping it could be something cool like helping with the constant barrage of social media posts to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.  The second because it appears that the Troop 18 adults tend to work in that area (Mr. Dennis, Mr. Hines, Mr. Erwin, Mr. Mooney all did in 2013 and from what I hear most if not all plan to go back in 2017).  The third because I know the zip lines / canopy tours were understaffed last time around and it will probably be very popular event again and I think it would be cool to help out there.  I briefly thought about the patch trading area because I do like me some patches, but decided against because I’m sure the really anal patch police folks will probably be running that show and while I like to collect patches I wouldn’t consider myself an expert.  I half thought about doing one of the aquatics items as well because it might let me be in the water some, but I’d probably have to get some kind of paddlecraft, lifeguard or aquatics training first.

If you are thinking about attending, my advice would be DO IT!  DO IT NOW!  It really is a great Scouting experience to be among 40,000 other Scouts and Scouters celebrating Scouting and doing all the fun stuff that makes Scouting, well, fun!

Expensive?  Definitely.  But it’s two years away.  Start saving now.  Have your Scout work towards it, fund raise, etc.   I know in our council (Dan Beard Council #438) that scholarships are available to cover some of the cost.  It’s worth the effort, and for the Scouts the effort they spend earning their way to Jamboree can help make that Jamboree experience all the more special and meaningful.

If you are registering a youth member (Boy Scout or Venturer), there is no immediate cost to register.  If you are registering for staff, there is a $150 deposit due at the time you submit your registration.

Interesting in knowing more about Jamboree?  You can learn more – and register – at the Summit website.

Hope to see you there!

-Middletownscouter

Low Battery Warning; Time to Recharge


Nowdays, just about everyone has a mobile phone, or an iPod or some other electronic device that has those battery bars on them. We are all familiar with the bars, and what happens when there are no bars. Sometimes the little picture of the battery flashes, sometimes you get warnings about low battery. And sometimes you have to see for yourself because there isn’t a warning. But in all cases, if we don’t plug that device in and recharge the batteries, it will turn itself off. It will stop operating properly (or at all).

If only we could have those little battery lights over our heads too, so we could know when our batteries need recharged. I think I saw a commercial for a hotel chain or something like that with this premise, but I’m not just talking about getting a good night’s sleep here. I’m talking about something a little more profound I suppose. Where it isn’t just physically tired, it’s that feeling of being fully drained. Unmotivated. Meh. Whatever you want to call it. In Scouts, for those of us who volunteer (or were volun-told) as leaders, I call it Scouting Burnout.

Scouting Burnout (noun)
1. Exhaustion of physical or emotional strength or motivation (aka “Scouting Spirit”) usually as a result of prolonged stress or frustration (see also: dealing with parents)

And it happens to all of us at some point. Sometimes it is just as small as “You know, what? No. I’m not going to go to that meeting or run that event. Let someone else do it.” Sometimes though it’s the mass email to everyone you can think of telling them all how you really feel and that you’re done. Not just burning the bridges, but setting them up with the C4 charges and KABLOOEY! Unfortunately that can lead to salting the earth as well and cause an otherwise good unit to struggle or fail. Luckily, most Scouting Burnout falls towards the first part of the scale and goes up to “I’m out” without the drama.

Over the last several years since I became a Scouter, I have seen the entire range of Scouting Burnout in other leaders that I’ve known and been close with (including the salting the earth type, at least twice). And I’ve had my fair share of burnout as well. The key is to deal with it early before it builds up and causes drama to ensue. Everyone has their own way to relax, and when Scouts is that way and it is stressing you, that is double-plus-ungood. So how do you relax and recharge from your relaxation activity? Work? I think not! For everyone, their way to recharge their Scouting spirit is different.

For me, I go to camp. Spending a week at resident camp, not worrying about parents or checkbook balances or the next meeting or event, getting to spend time with my boys, that’s what recharges me. Not just getting to watch my boys do all those great things that Scouting offers, but getting to do it too. I get to be a big 8 year old and it is a blast! I come home and my Scouting Spirit is at max power, ready to go. It’s almost kind of a letdown to come home from camp and realize slowly that the rest of the world isn’t as great as camp was. Alas, real life does tend to intervene. But the time spent at that camp really amps me up in the Scouting sense. My wife will tell you that physically it is the opposite though, I am usually exhausted and completely worthless for a few days after we get back. 🙂

Unfortunately, resident camp is only one time a year. So what do I do in the meanwhile? Well, we camp out a lot, but it isn’t quite the same thing (very close though). But one of the neat things that happened last year was National Jamboree. I didn’t get to go this time around (I am *so* at the Summit in 2013!), but I spent the entire week listening in on QBSA Jambo Radio that I came across with much the same effect. The best part was heading down to our local council service center to watch the live stream of A Shining Light. That was great. I also DVR’ed it so I can rewatch at home at my leisure, thanks to Dish Network and BYU-TV.

The best part? Mike Rowe. I really think his speech was the highlight of the second arena show (Switchfoot and Alex Boye were also great too). So when I start to get a wee bit into those low bars on my Scoutometer, I jump onto UStream and re-watch his speech. So below is either the video embedded into this post or a link to it (I’m having issues getting it to play nicely).

http://www.ustream.tv/flash/viewer.swf

Link to the video on Ustream’s site.

What do you guys do to fight off or remedy Scouting Burnout?

Published!


So last week just after the first Arena show, which I listened to most of on QBSA Jambo Radio, I felt compelled to write an Editorial piece about the Scouts for my local newspaper.  Their usual submission requirements are no greater than 350 words…this came in around 1,000.  I had figured that it would not get run.  But looking at the paper’s website, it was there this morning!

Middletown Journal – Distinguished Century of Achievement

Of course given the number of “…” in there they heavily edited what I sent them to fit in the allotted space.

I will put the version I sent them below.  Any typos or info errors in either version are my own.  I think they’re all correct but the only one I’m not sure about is the number of National Jamborees.  I put 17 in my article, but then I heard it referred to several times as the 16th.  Did we disavow one of them?  Looking at the Wikipedia article, it appears that we had Jambos in 1937 (makeup for 1935 being cancelled due to an outbreak of polio), 1950, 1953, 1957 (my dad went to this one), 1960, 1964, 1969, 1973 (two locations with staggered start dates but I only counted this as one), 1977, 1981, 1985, 1989, 1993, 1997, 2001, 2005 & 2010.  Anyway, kind of a sidebar but still.  Here’s the article:

“We need the Scouts now more than ever.”

During the next week over 50,000 young people and their leaders from every state in our nation have converged on Fort A.P. Hill in Virginia for the Boy Scouts of America’s National Jamboree.  This year’s jamboree marks both the last to be held at AP Hill, and also the centennial celebration of the Boy Scouts of America.  It is the seventeenth national jamboree held by the BSA since the first was held in 1937.  Included in this group are several Middletown boys and adults, we wish them good luck and safe travels!

Scouting first began worldwide in England in 1907, formed by Lord Robert Baden Powell.  In 1910, a group of men that included Cincinnatian Daniel Carter Beard brought the Scouting movement to America.  For the last 100 years, the BSA has been the nation’s largest and most effective youth leadership training program for young men and women.  The BSA has had over 110 million members over the last century, with current youth membership of approximately 4 million.

During this centennial celebration, it is a good time to reflect on the positive impact Scouting has had on our country for the last 100 years.  In each of those key times in our nation’s history, the Scouts have stepped up to serve.  From food and scrap drives, selling war bonds and planting victory gardens during the first and second world wars, to assembling care packages sent to our soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan today.  Cleaning up our city, county, state and national parks, there are no better friends to the outdoors than the Scouts!  The Scout Slogan is “Do a good turn daily,” and it is not just lip service.

Scouting has helped produce some of the most prolific leaders in the fields of industry, technology, science, athletics and politics.  The list of prominent men and women who were Scouts is quite long and includes Microsoft founder Bill Gates, successful businessman and former presidential candidate Ross Perot, former first ladies Barbara and Laura Bush, and US Presidents John F. Kennedy and George W. Bush and Gerald Ford, the only President who was an Eagle Scout.  Eleven of the twelve men who have stepped foot on the moon were Scouts; the first and last were Eagle Scouts.  And thousands of other members of the space program were Scouts first.

While it is easy to rest on one’s laurels after such a distinguished century of achievement and service, now is when we need the Scouts more than ever, and they are responding.  When technology is making the world smaller and the sound of kids playing outside is fading into distant memory, Scouting is at the forefront of taking back the outdoors for kids…and taking the kids outdoors.  The Scouting program, at all levels, is primarily an outdoors program, but it is not only outdoors.  Changes to the program have been made to recognize that kids are more tech savvy than most adults these days.  At most levels of Scouting, there are opportunities to learn about balancing one’s life, one of the most important things our kids today can learn.  A whole day spent on the computer, in front of the TV, or exercising only the thumbs playing video games or texting is a day wasted.  Through Scouting, our youth are learning that idea of balance – financially, nutritionally, and in the way they spend their time.  They are learning about new ideas, skills and hobbies that can later lead to a career.  They are learning the value of education and of hard work.  They’re learning that the best way to help yourself is to help others.  And they’re having FUN while doing so.  Scouting is “fun with a purpose,” our founder famously noted.  That purpose is to prepare our youth to succeed in the future.

The lessons of morals, ethics, character, conservation, leadership and citizenship youth gain through their involvement in Scouts prepare them for a great future.  With Scouting, the only limit to the success a young man or woman can attain is their own determination, effort and imagination!  These are lessons that cannot be learned on a sports field and sadly are no longer being taught completely in the classroom anymore.  There are not many organizations anymore where people say “On my honor” and mean it…Scouts is one of those.

We in Middletown have had the good fortune to have a strong Scouting presence, having formerly been the home of our own Boy Scout Council.  There are several Cub Scout Packs, Boy Scout Troops and a Venturing Crew that would love to help teach your son or daughter join the adventure that is Scouting!  While membership drives primarily happen at the beginning of the school year, youth can join at any time year round.  Most of the area’s Scout Leaders are fully trained and have years of experience.  Like Everett Sherron, who has recently passed over 70 years of affiliation with the Boy Scouts!  We have some of the best camps in the nation and being between Dayton and Cincinnati have a large number of opportunities for Scouts to participate in a whole host of different experiences.

Cub Scouting is for boys aged 6-11 (generally from the completion of kindergarten through the spring of fifth grade).  Boy Scouts is open for boys from age 11 (fifth grade) through their 18th birthday.  Venturing is the high adventure, coeducational program for young men and women who are at least age 13 and have completed eighth grade through their 21st birthday.  For more information on Scouting, including how to join a unit in our area, visit http://www.danbeard.org or call Dan Beard Council at 513-577-7700.

If everyone lived their life by the points of the Scout Law – Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean and Reverent – just think of what a great place that would be!  Think globally, act locally – be a Scout!

Scott Walker
Committee Chairman
Cub Scout Pack 19
Hopewell District
Dan Beard Council
Boy Scouts of America

Girl Scouts congratulate the Boy Scouts


http://blog.girlscouts.org/2010/07/congrats-to-boy-scouts-of-america.html

The BSA and GS-USA sure have taken different paths to get where they are today, and as a parent of one of each I can see good and bad points in each program.  They are both quite different programs, but the end game of each – to build young people of character, prepare them to make moral and ethical choices over their lifetimes, give them citizenship and leadership skills they will take with them into adulthood – remains the same.  And both have been and are succeeding for the last century (or nearly a century).

The Girl Scouts celebrate 98 years of service this year, formed by Juliette Gordon Low in 1912.  It would be neat if they’d have what I think would be their first ever National Jamboree on their centennial, I know my daughter would be pumped about attending.  Let’s get on that ladies!

(Thanks to my facebook friend Jennifer for sharing the GS-USA blog link.)

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